Mental wellbeing at work is just as important as physical wellbeing, and the two tend to go hand in hand. But many people forget to ensure to keep an eye on their mental health, and sometimes allow it to slip.

Work is where you spend most of your time, and it is usually the environment that can cause the most stress and anxiety. However, there are ways to manage these feelings and to keep on top of your mental wellbeing.

Talk about your feelings

We’re not super humans. There are times when work gets the better of us and it becomes frustrating but that is okay! Most workplaces have started to introduce Mental Health First Aider’s who are trained to listen when you feel like you aren’t coping and guide you towards professional help should you need it. If your workplace hasn’t yet implemented this, that’s okay, find someone who you trust and ask if they’d be happy to hear you vent for a moment or two. It isn’t a sign of weakness, it’s the power of taking charge of your own wellbeing and not allowing yourself to store up negative feelings.

Keep active

Keeping active can have a tremendous impact on our mental wellbeing as well as physical. Taking the time to go for a run, or a hike can give us the breathing space we need to organise our thoughts. Over time it also boosts our self-esteem, helps you concentrate, and sleep better. All of which assists with our mental wellbeing remaining positive and in check.

Eat well

It’s surprising how beneficial a good healthy diet is for our mental wellbeing. Eating regularly and choosing food that releases energy slowly will keep your blood sugar levels steady – instead of sugary food that makes your blood sugar rise and fall quickly, as they can leave you feeling irritable and depressed.

Ask for help

If you find yourself drowning with your workload, and unsure what to do, and you feel yourself beginning to panic, don’t. Ask for help. Your colleague’s are your team and you are all there to help each other out. Asking for assistance can destress you, and enable you to regain control over overpowering feelings. There is nothing wrong or weak about asking for help; there is a limit to how much people can cope with.